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Needham vehicular accident critically injures one person

An individual was taken to the hospital after said victim was hit by a motor vehicle along the railroad tracks at Main Street in Needham in Norfolk County, Massachusetts. According to Patch, the accident occurred around 6:15 a.m. on Tuesday, September 27.

The victim was transported to Beth Israel Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts by the Needham Fire Department for the treatment of a head wound and other serious injuries. At the time of the transport, the victim was at least semi-conscious. The accident is still under investigation by the Needham Police Department and the Wellesley Police Department crash reconstruction team.

Our attorneys at Crowe & Mulvey, LLP provide legal services for clients in the state of Massachusetts. We handle personal injury accident cases ranging from automobile accidents and trucking negligence to drunk driving accidents and malfunctioning vehicles, among others. Call our offices today at (617) 426-4488 to learn more about our practice and see what we can offer you.
 


Elizabeth Mulvey included in Best Lawyers®

Elizabeth Mulvey of Crowe & Mulvey, LLP has been recognized by her peers in the 23rd Edition of The Best Lawyers in America for her work in medical malpractice and personal injury litigation.

Inclusion in Best Lawyers is based entirely on feedback from peers. To be included, a lawyer must first be nominated by another attorney. They are then reviewed and voted on extensively before finally being accepted. Being named to Best Lawyers is a great honor in the profession.

We are proud of Elizabeth’s accomplishments and strive for continued success in personal injury and medical malpractice cases in Boston, MA.


70% of American teenagers admit to using apps on phone while driving – survey

A new poll released by San Francisco, California-based nonprofit organization Common Sense Media has shown that at least 70% of teenagers in the United States admit to using applications on their phones while driving and 50% of them say that they feel as if they are addicted to their mobile phones.

Another survey, issued by the American Automobile Association, showed that 68% of teenagers in the country admit to composing and sending text messages, making phone calls, and listening to music while driving. The AAA noted that 60% of vehicular accidents involving teenagers are caused by distracted driving.

Massachusetts-based Agawam Auto School said in an interview with local news channel 22News that a person has the same chance of being involved in a car accident that was caused by distracted driving as a car accident that was caused by drunken driving.

If you’ve been involved in an accident caused by a distracted driver, our high-quality personal injury attorneys at Crowe & Mulvey, LLP give individual attention and moral support alongside legal help and have an added benefit of many years of experience in representing victims of personal injury accidents in the state of Massachusetts. Call our offices today at (617) 426-4488.


Pedestrian hit by vehicle on Central Street

A woman sustained a head injury after she was struck by a van along Central Street in Acton, Massachusetts at around 12:47 p.m. last Wednesday, July 6.

The woman, who was yet to be identified publicly by the police, was airlifted via helicopter to Boston Medical Center for the quick treatment of her injuries.

In an e-mailed statement to reporters, Acton Deputy Police Chief Richard Burrows said police officers responded to the scene of the accident and found an unconscious but still breathing middle-aged woman lying on the road. Eyewitness and driver accounts show that the woman went up on the hood of the van and rolled off to fall onto the pavement.

Our high-quality personal injury attorneys at Crowe & Mulvey, LLP will provide your personal injury case with undivided attention and bestow you with compassionate and emotional support. Call our offices today at (617) 426-4488 to speak with a qualified member of our legal team.


Quinnipiac student dies in single-vehicle crash

Nineteen-year-old Quinnipiac University student Jacqueline Gray was a passenger in a car with five other people when the brakes of the vehicle supposedly stopped working. The apparent malfunction caused their vehicle to crash into a telephone pole around 11 p.m. on Sunday, July 3.

The car was travelling to a fireworks display in Milford and was on Congress Street at the time of the accident. Gray died as a result of her injuries while confined at the UMass Memorial Medical Center on Monday, July 4. Quinnipiac University issued the following statement: “It was with profound sadness that we informed our university community today about the loss of Jacqueline Gray, a member of the Class of 2019 who was a dean’s list student majoring in psychology in the College of Arts and Sciences.”

Our team at Crowe & Mulvey, LLP are sending thoughts and condolences to the victim’s family and friends as they mourn the loss of their loved one.


Springfield man pleads not guilty after fatal accident

28-year-old Springfield, Massachusetts resident Thomas Murphy pleaded not guilty last Wednesday, June 22 to charges that include leaving the scene of a personal injury accident that resulted in death and driving an unregistered vehicle. The charges come after Murphy hit a pedestrian, 52-year-old James Heath, and caused his death around 10:30 p.m. on May 29, 2016.

According to an article of The Hastings Tribune, Murphy was released on personal recognizance after entering his plea. Heath died at the hospital as a result of the mortal injuries he incurred. Murphy was incarcerated in 2010 after he was convicted of a bank robbery.

The  personal injury lawyers at Crowe & Mulvey, LLP provide comprehensive legal services to our clients in the state of Massachusetts. We attend to the legal needs of injured victims to help them recover the compensation they deserve as a result of their injuries. Call our offices at (617) 426-4488 to discuss your personal situation and learn more about our services.


The most dangerous states for motorists

In 2014, 32,675 people in the United States were killed in car accidents. Although deaths by car accident totaled roughly 10,000 fewer in 2014 than they had in 2004, motor vehicle accidents are still a major concern for motorists in this country.

On average, there were 10.2 deaths for every 100,000 people in the United States in 2014. In Wyoming, which is considered the most dangerous state in which to drive, there were 25.7 deaths for every 100,000 individuals. Wyoming’s traffic fatality rate was five times higher than either Rhode Island or Massachusetts, which are considered the safest states in which to drive. One major factor that contributes to traffic mortality rates in states is the type of road most used. For example, car accidents occur at a disproportionately high rate on rural roads. Motorists are also more likely to drive recklessly and not wear seat belts along rural roads.

The attorneys at Crowe & Mulvey, LLP, are known for their superior representation in medical malpractice cases, but we also take on a number of personal injury cases for clients who have suffered in a car accident. Whatever legal representation you need, our offices are willing to help. Call us at (617) 426-4488 to see what we can do for you.


A New Direction for Recreational Use Statute?

A recent Appeals Court decision suggests that the court may be taking a closer look at the Massachusetts Recreational Use State, G.L. c.21, section 17C.  The statute, which bars ordinary negligence claims against landowners who allow the public to use their property for recreational purposes “without imposing a charge or fee,” has in recent years been expanded far beyond what the legislature originally intended.

The court in Amaral v Seekonk Grand Prix Corp. rejected a claim by the operator of a go-kart facility that a mother who was injured while watching her sons ride could not recover after being struck by an errant go-kart.  The facility had raised the Recreational Use Statute as a defense, claiming that, since it permitted the mother to watch her sons without paying for the privilege, it was not liable for negligence.

At first blush, this defense seems patently absurd: how could a money-making operation possibly avoid liability to patrons injured through its negligence?  How could a statute which was intended to encourage landowners to allow the public to use open space for hiking, horseback riding and similar activities be used to protect a business? Yet, the go-kart operator was able to point to a line of decisions in which spectators at an event for which admission was not charged could not recover for negligence.  And the Superior Court judge who heard the motion for summary judgment agreed.

Fortunately, common sense prevailed in the Appeals Court.  The court reversed the grant of summary judgment, noting that the plaintiff had purchased admission tickets for her sons to ride the go-karts.  The court noted that “Grand Prix could fully anticipate that a parent accompanying minor children and paying a fee on their behalf would qualify as a paying customer under the statute.”  Because the plaintiff had paid a fee “for her particular use of the land,” her claim was not barred.

The decision still doesn’t go as far as many victims would hope–and there was a much easier way for the court to get there.  The statute does not require that the individual user pay a fee, but merely that the landowner allow recreational use by the public “without imposing a charge or fee.”  The plain language of the statute would seem to exempt commercial money-making endeavors from its scope.


York woman suspected of hit-and-run found with prior driving charges

Twenty-one-year-old York County, Massachusetts resident Carolyn Lee was arrested on a manslaughter charge after allegedly striking 23-year-old Quincy resident Emily Zarnoch and her boyfriend with her 2000 GMC Yukon as they walked along Ridge Road in York earlier that day, then leaving after the accident took place.

Zarnoch died from the injuries that she sustained during the accident a few hours after being taken to Portsmouth Regional Hospital in New Hampshire.

York Police Sergeant Luke Ernenwein said Lee’s sport utility vehicle was spotted on Long Sands Road, where she was immediately pulled over by the authorities.

Police said Lee, who had been driving drunk at the time of the incident at 366 Ridge Road a little before 12:32 a.m. and drove off after causing the accident, had already been charged with driving under the influence in 2013 in a different incident.

Lee is currently detained at the York County Jail and is assigned a $25,000 bail.


Massachusetts has second lowest rate of injury-related deaths in U.S.

A new report states that Massachusetts has the second lowest rate of injury-related deaths in the United States.

Massachusetts scores points for safety in a few different categories, including having a law that requires booster seats in vehicles for children, instituting vaccination programs for residents, and having a bicycle helmet law. However, the report also identified areas for improvement in the state, such as mandating the use of ignition interlock devices for drunk drivers as well as creating a primary seatbelt law.

The report noted that the leading cause of injury-related deaths in the state is drug overdose, which exceeds statistics for automobile accident cases.

Northampton public health director Merridith O’Leary said that more than 1,000 deaths in the state can be attributed to opioids – heroin and prescription drug use – in 2014, and said that number is bound to increase because three of the largest cities in the state have yet to report their data regarding the matter.

Despite these promising and encouraging statistics, the attorneys at Crowe & Mulvey, LLP, know that residents of Massachusetts still can do more to decrease the number of preventable accidents, deaths, and injuries that occur every year. If you or someone you love has been injured because of someone else’s recklessness or negligence, we are here to help. Call us today at (617) 426-4488 to learn more.